Rescued by Dr. Abidan Shah

RESCUED by Dr. Shah, Clearview Church, Henderson, NC

Introduction:  Someone said, “Dads keep you in line, but it’s the moms that come to the rescue.” It’s Mother’s Day Weekend. So, here are a couple of videos of moms coming to the rescue in the nick of time. #1. Mom catches her baby falling headfirst. #2. Mom saves her child from being buried under a slab of snow. #3. Mom catches her child from falling from a stairwell. I’ve even heard of stories of moms lifting up cars to get their child out. I’m sure many of you have similar stories about your mom. In this message, we are going to look at the first half of Psalm 34, where David not only thanks God for coming to his rescue, but also, reminds others around him to do the same. This is still part of our series through 1 Peter, but since Peter quoted from Psalm 34, we are studying it in detail. Here’s the main point: Just like moms know us at our worst and still love us and come to our rescue, God also knows at our worst and still loves us and comes to our rescue. In fact, the primary way we encounter God is in times of trouble when he comes to our rescue. Worship and praise are a natural outcome of a people who have been overawed by God’s rescue in their life.

Psalm 34 A Psalm of David when he pretended madness before Abimelech, who drove him away, and he departed.

Context: The literal translation of the title is “A Psalm of David when he changed his tastebefore Abimelech, who drove him away, and he departed.” As you’ve heard me say repeatedly, more scholars now believe that these titles were original to the author. In other words, David wrote Psalm 34 in response to the situation we looked at last weekend in 1 Samuel 21. For the benefit of those who may not be familiar with that passage, it is the description of a very low and embarrassing moment in David’s life, when he had to change his taste, do things contrary to his nature. After saying goodbye to Jonathan at Gibeah because it was confirmed that Saul wanted to kill him, he went to the priest Ahimelech at Nob for spiritual advice. Unfortunately, the priest was more afraid about the curse on his family than helping David. In fact, he transferred his fear over to David, and, before long, David was scared and lying left and right. Important principle: You become like the people you hang around with. If they are full of fear, you will be full of fear. If they are full of Christ, you will be full of Christ. In his newly acquired fear, this giant killer, anointed king, the one they sang about “Saul has slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands,” ran for help but in the wrong direction towards Gath into the Philistine territory. By the way, he was carrying their slain heroes sword! Remember, the priest had offered him Goliath’s sword. Another important principle: Fear will sabotage your perception and your reasoning, causing you to lose your spiritual GPS. At Gath, they recognized him right away and reported him to Achish, the king of Gath. 1 Samuel 21:12 says, “Now David took these words to heart, and was very much afraid of Achish the king of Gath. 13 So he changed his behavior before them, pretended madness in their hands, scratched on the doors of the gate, and let his saliva fall down on his beard.” What a sad sight it must have been…the future King of Israel, through whose lineage would come the Savior of the World, acting like a fool before a Philistine King. As you know, Achish dismissed what his men were saying and 1 Samuel 22:1 “David therefore departed from there and escaped to the cave of Adullam.” By the way, he had to come right through the Elah Valley, the place where he had fought against the giant Goliath. How do you think he was feeling? Keep in mind that he was much more than just some brute warrior. He was also very artistically wired. He is a ball of fear, embarrassment, doubt, and hopelessness. He captured these emotions in Psalm 142 “A Contemplation of David. A Prayer when he was in the cave. 1 I cry out to the LORD with my voice; With my voice to the LORD I make my supplication. 2 I pour out my complaint before Him; I declare before Him my trouble. 3 When my spirit was overwhelmed within me, Then You knew my path. In the way in which I walk They have secretly set a snare for me. 4 Look on my right hand and see, for there is no one who acknowledges me; Refuge has failed me; No one cares for my soul. 5 I cried out to You, O LORD: I said, ‘You are my refuge, My portion in the land of the living. 6 Attend to my cry, For I am brought very low;Deliver me from my persecutors, for they are stronger than I. 7 Bring my soul out of prison,That I may praise Your name; The righteous shall surround me, For You shall deal bountifully with me.’”

Application: Have you come out of a traumatic experience at your Gath? Have you had to walk by your Valley of Elah and see how good it was at one time? Are you sitting by your Cave of Adullam afraid, humiliated, and hopeless? Sometimes, people get hung in these caves. They feel afraid. They feel all alone. They feel utterly humiliated and ashamed. They lose their praise. David called upon God. How about you?

Did God answer David? Of course! 1 Samuel 22      1 “…So when his brothers and all his father’s house heard it, they went down there to him.” I am sure David must have felt wonderful that God was answering his prayers. 2 And everyone who was in distress, everyone who was in debt, and everyone who was discontented gathered to him…” Can you imagine the mood of the place? The Cave was dark, but it must have gotten darker as all the distressed, indebted, and discontented people crowded in! David through the Holy Spirit must have quickly realized that this experience was not just about him. It was also meant to help others. So, he wrote another psalm, Psalm 34. This was not like Psalm 142. This was an “Acrostic Psalm” where each verse begins with a Hebrew Alphabet in order. There are about 8 in the Bible, of which Psalm 119 is the most famous and extensive “Alphabetic Psalm” in the Bible. Why did he write this psalm acrostically? Several suggestions: Memorization, Order, Completeness, Ease in Teaching, Aesthetic value. The best suggestion I found was by a South African scholar (Ignatius Gous):

“The author seems to help his audience to cope with adversity and suffering which they experience, contrary to what they as faithful and righteous believes expected. He reassures them that God cares for them even though things may look chaotic and out of hand. On the surface their experiences seem to indicate that things are out of control. However, if they look beyond the immediate, there is an underlying order, namely God’s care. This order gives structure to their existence, like the alphabet gives structure to the poem.”

Something else, David went back and forth between his experience and the experience of the distressed, indebted, and the discontented who came to him. This was not an individual song, but a community song. This was not a song about the justification of his fear or his momentary lapse in judgment. Neither was it about his quick thinking and amazing acting skills. Instead, he wrote it to turn the attention of the people from their fears to God’s rescue. He wanted them to glorify God.

Application: Have you realized that your trials are not about you? They are for others. What are you doing at your cave?

With that in mind, let’s walk through the first 10 verses:

1 I will bless (posture) the LORD at all times; his praise (words) shall continually be in my mouth. 2 My soul shall make its boast in the LORD; the humble shall hear of it and be glad. 3Oh, magnify the LORD with me, and let us exalt His name together. 4 I sought the LORD, and He heard me, and delivered me from all my fears. 5 They looked to Him and were radiant, and their faces were not ashamed. 6 This poor man cried out, and the LORD heardhim, and saved him out of all his troubles. 7 The angel of the LORD encamps all around those who fear Him, and delivers them. 8 Oh, taste and see that the LORD is good; Blessedis the man who trusts in Him! 9 Oh, fear the LORD, you His saints! There is no want to those who fear Him. 10 The young lions lack and suffer hunger; But those who seek the LORD shall not lack any good thing.

We may look at this psalm more carefully next week.

Invitation: Every step of the way, David glorified God for rescuing him and he encouraged others to do the same. Do you? Have you been truly ultimately rescued? Are you saved?

  • Matthew 1:21 “you shall call his name Jesus, for he will rescue his people from their sins”
  • Luke 2:11 “unto you is born…a Rescuer, who is Christ the Lord”
  • Luke 19:10 “the Son of Man came to seek and to rescue the lost”
  • Acts 4:12 “there is rescue in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be rescued.”

Misstep by Dr. Abidan Shah

MISSTEP by Dr. Shah, Clearview Church, Henderson, NC

Introduction:  Have you ever been startled? I was one time when I was working late night security and the big AC unit came on behind the gym and scared me to death. When people are deathly afraid, they stop thinking. I have seen ladies climb on top of dining tables to get away from a tiny mouse! In our series through 1 Peter, we have been going through a miniseries called ONE MIND where Peter is reminding the believers to be united and not give in to fear. Main point: Healthy fear keeps us in step, but unhealthy fear causes us to misstep. When we are faced with the unfamiliar, it can drive us to isolation and even temporarily block our ability to reason. In such moments, we need those who will breathe godly courage back into our lives.

1 Peter 3:10 “For ‘he who would love life and see good days, let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his lips from speaking deceit.’”

Context: In exhorting the persecuted Christians in Asia Minor to be of one mind and not turn against each other, Peter quoted from Psalm 34. As we have done throughout this series through 1 Peter, every time Peter quoted from the Old Testament, we went to that passage in the Old Testament and spend some time studying it. We’re going to do the same thing here. We’re going to spend some time in Psalm 34. This psalm begins with a short title that says, “A Psalm of David when he pretended madness before Abimelech, who drove him away, and he departed.” At one time, scholars doubted these titles, but more and more now think that they are original. So, what is the context of Psalm 34? To understand the context of Psalm 34, we have to go to 1 Samuel 21    12 “Now David took these words to heart, and was very much afraid of Achish the king of Gath. 13 So he changed his behavior before them, pretended madness in their hands, scratched on the doors of the gate, and let his saliva fall down on his beard.” What an unflattering picture of the giant killer, the anointed king, the man after God’s own heart, and the sweet psalmist of Israel! What would cause someone like David to act like this? Short answer, FEAR. To understand the long answer, we have to dig a little deeper, starting in chapters 17 through 20. In just 4 chapters, David had gone from being the most loved man in Israel to being the most wanted man in Israel:

  • Chapter 17 – David killed Goliath with a slingshot and saved the armies of Saul. Instantly, he was a hero in Israel; but this was no big deal for him since he had already killed a lion and a bear and rescued a lamb of his flock from its mouth.
  • Chapter 18 – David gained the favor of Saul who wouldn’t let him go back home. In fact, Jonathan, Saul’s son, and David became best friends. In time, David even began to lead the armies for Saul against the Philistines with great success, and the saying was, “Saul has slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands.” Unfortunately, Saul began to eye David with envy. He even tried to have him married off to his daughter so he could control him. Sadly, God had left Saul, but he was with David. Saul knew that and he even tried to kill David with a spear.
  • Chapter 19 – Jonathan tried to convince his father that David was loyal to him, which helped for a little while but not for long.
  • Chapter 20 – Saul was once again after killing David. At first, Jonathan didn’t believe David, but he realized very quickly that it was true when his father even tried to kill him. This is where that incident took place where Jonathan and David made a covenant with each other in the field. It says in 1 Samuel 20:42 “Then Jonathan said to David, “Go in peace, since we have both sworn in the name of the LORD, saying, ‘May the LORD be between you and me, and between your descendants and my descendants, forever.’ ” So he arose and departed, and Jonathan went into the city.
  • For the first time, David must have felt truly isolated. So, he went to the man of God. 1 Samuel 21:1 “Now David came to Nob, to Ahimelech the priest.” Keep in mind that he was the great grandson of Eli the high priest. And Ahimelech was afraid when he met David, and said to him, ‘Why are you alone, and no one is with you?’” The word for afraid in Hebrew is “charad,” which means to be terrified or trembling. Of course, he must have heard about the feud between Saul and David, but more is going on here. In 1 Samuel 2, God had pronounced a curse on the house of Eli because he would not discipline his sons, Hophni and Phinehas. 31 “Behold, the days are coming that I will cut off your arm and the arm of your father’s house, so that there will not be an old man in your house. 32 And you will see an enemy in My dwelling place, despite all the good which God does for Israel. And there shall not be an old man in your house forever.” David must have looked like the grim reaper to Ahimelech.

Illustration: After my dad converted from Islam to Christianity, he went to a mainline church in his hometown and asked them to baptize him. They knew who he was. His father was the police commissioner. They asked him if it was because of a girl. When he gave his testimony, they refused to baptize him because of fear.

What was the impact on David? 1 Samuel 21:2 So David said to Ahimelech the priest, “The king has ordered me on some business, and said to me, ‘Do not let anyone know anything about the business on which I send you, or what I have commanded you.’ Important principle: When you are around someone who is full of fear, unless you are strong, it will jump on you.

Let me talk about fear for a moment. What is fear? Researchers are still unsure. Suomi and Harlow – Is it an emotional state? Is it a motivational force? Can it be perceived as a stimulus? Kahoe notes that it often gets confused with anger, anxiety, and phobia, but there is a difference: “Anger incites attack against a threatening object, fear incites withdrawal. Fear relates to an identifiable object or event; anxiety is interpreted as free-floating apprehension and probably incorporates other emotions with fear. Normal fear addresses a realistic danger, phobia a relatively persistent and irrational fear.”

Some research done on rhesus monkeys has helped us understand how fear works. By the way, I don’t believe that we are descended from monkeys. I believe that we are designed by the same creator. We can see some patterns regarding how fear works. Suomi and Harlow concluded that fear is both inherited and acquired. A certain amount of fear is actually good and healthy and it bonds us to our loved ones and “enhances an existing social relationship.” On the other hand, “too much exposure to fear stimuli too often can have undesirable consequences.”

What happens when someone has intense fear? It can sabotage his/her perception, thinking, and motor processes (From Kahoe). When a person is in a state of fear, they want to comprehend and escape at the same time. Their adrenalin starts rushing. Sometimes, overprediction can lead to phobias and panic attacks. In the short run, this can help you adapt to your surroundings, but, in the long run, it can lead to dysfunctions.

While David was talking to the priest and getting some bread from him, he noticed from the corner of his eye that one of Saul’s henchman was there, an Edomite named Doeg. Now things began to spiral downwards for him. 8 And David said to Ahimelech, “Is there not here on hand a spear or a sword? For I have brought neither my sword nor my weapons with me, because the king’s business required haste.” 9 So the priest said, “The sword of Goliath the Philistine, whom you killed in the Valley of Elah, there it is, wrapped in a cloth behind the ephod. If you will take that, take it. For there is no other except that one here.” And David said, “There is none like it; give it to me.” 10 Then David arose and fled that day from before Saul, and went to Achish the king of Gath. Now, he took the Enemy’s weapon and made the foolish choice to head to the Enemy’s territory. 11 And the servants of Achish said to him, “Is this not David the king of the land? Did they not sing of him to one another in dances, saying: ‘Saul has slain his thousands, And David his ten thousands’?” 12 Now David took these words to heart, and was very much afraid of Achish the king of Gath. This was where he began to act like he had lost his mind. His performance was so convincing that Achish said to his servants – 14 “…Look, you see the man is insane. Why have you brought him to me? 15 Have I need of madmen, that you have brought this fellow to play the madman in my presence? Shall this fellow come into my house?”

That’s how the Enemy works. When we allow him to infiltrate our mind, he turns the very words that once brought courage to us to bring fear into our lives. He humiliates us in the presence of all and makes us a laughing stock.

Application: Have you been infected by fear? Is the Enemy having a heyday with you?

What did David do? Like the Prodigal Son, he came to himself. 1 Samuel 22      1 “David therefore departed from there and escaped to the cave of Adullam. So when his brothers and all his father’s house heard it, they went down there to him. 2 And everyone who was in distress, everyone who was in debt, and everyone who was discontented gathered to him. So he became captain over them. And there were about four hundred men with him.” These were giant killers. One killed 300 at one time with a spear. Three of them crossed behind enemy line and brought water for David from Bethlehem. One killed a lion in a pit on a snowy day. The wrong companions had to go so the right companions could come to David.

How is this connected to 1 Peter? Peter wanted the believers in Asia Minor to be of one mind with each other. Together, they would be a mighty army for God.

Isaiah 41:10 “Fear not, for I am with you; Be not dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you, Yes, I will help you, I will uphold you with My righteous right hand.” 1 John 4     18 There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves torment. But he who fears has not been made perfect in love. 19 We love Him because He first loved us.

Application: How do you handle fear? Who are you surrounded by? Are you saved?

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