Prayer: Doctrine by Dr. Abidan Shah

Prayer Doctrine.jpg

PRAYER – DOCTRINE by Dr. Shah, Clearview Church, Henderson

Introduction:  Kids have some very interesting prayers! I found a few online:

  • Dear God, If you give me genie lamp like Alladin I will give you anything you want except my money or my chess set. Raphael
  • Dear God, Maybe Cain and Abel would not kill each so much if they had their own rooms. It works with my brother. Larry
  • Dear God, Thank you for the baby brother but what I prayed for was a puppy. Joyce
  • Dear God, Please send Dennis Clark to a different camp this year. Peter
  • God, I would like to live 900 years like the guy in the Bible. Love, Chris.
  • Dear God, I want to be just like my Daddy when I get big but not with so much hair all over. Sam

Unlike kids, who pray with a childlike faith and innocence, adults have a complex and sometimes even an unbelieving attitude towards prayer. Today we begin a 2-part series on prayer: first, we will focus on doctrine, and then, on practice. Here’s the main point of the first message on the doctrine of prayer: Our prayers reflect our understanding of God’s providence. In other words, our understanding of how much God is in control and how much free will we have will directly impact how and how much we pray.

1 John 5     14 “Now this is the confidence that we have in Him, that if we ask anything according to His will, He hears us. 15 And if we know that He hears us, whatever we ask, we know that we have the petitions that we have asked of Him.”

Background: The Greek word for confidence is “parresia,” which can be translated as openness, confidence, boldness, and frankness. This is the kind of spirit we should have when we come to God in prayer.

As many of you know, I grew up in a Christian home with a pastor for my dad. We were not a perfect family, but we were a praying family. From an early age, I remember watching my mom, my dad, and my grandma pray. In church, I remember listening to adults pray, just like we do here. We even had home prayer meetings twice a week. We had 2 different language services (still do) and we would meet at different people’s homes each week to pray; Wednesday evening was people of the Hindi language service and Thursday would be of the English language service. As a little boy, I remember praying all the time—for a baby sister, for a new bike, for new shoes, for good grades in school, for being able to win a race with the other boys. I believed in prayer. But then, it happened. When, I can’t pinpoint the time, but I began to become more “realistic” and “grownup” about what I asked in my prayers. I began to lose the childlike faith and innocence in my prayers. I still prayed, but it wasn’t the same. I believe I have just described the prayer life of most of you here.

Why do we experience such a shift in our prayer life? Short answer: We grow up and face real life. We go through suffering and loss. Our hopes get dashed. Our prayers remain unanswered. We even come face-to-face with evil. Now, there is a change in our view of God and our prayers. It’s like the child who has a toy doctor kit and one day he gets a little cut. Instead of using the instruments (thermometer, stethoscope, blood pressure kit) in the box, mom and dad take him/her to a real doctor or nurse who have real instruments. That’s when the child realizes that the instruments are simply toys. They are just pretend. Now, the child does play with the kit but it’s only pretend.

Long answer: Real life jars our view of God’s providence, and, with that, our prayers change as well. Let’s begin with defining the word “Providence.” For starters, that word is not found in the Bible but the concept is everywhere. Basically, it is the answer to how much is God in control of the world he has created and how much can we influence him. When we begin to seriously deal with the matter of God’s providence, a lot of complex and deep questions rise up. I don’t have time to deal with all of them here. There are some wonderful books out there like “Providence and Prayer” by Terrance Tiessen. Here, I just want to bring out a few of the major ones (they are interconnected): Is God timeless or is he bound by time just as we are? Because if he is in the same boat as we are, then, how can he really be prepared for what is coming around the corner? Does God know the future? How much does he know? If he does know the future, why doesn’t he do something about bad things? Does God allow evil to exist? Is he helpless to combat evil? Is he allowing evil to bring about something good? How about when it brings a lot of pain? Do I have any free will? Can people interfere with the plan of God? Does God change his mind? Bottom line: Does prayer change things?

If such questions about God’s providence are not answered, our prayer life will suffer.

Here’s how the proper view of the providence of God can help our prayer life:

  1. God’s providential control is comprehensive, detailed, capable, loving, and best.

There is much about the providence of God in creation in the Book of Psalms and Job. But, here is a classic passage from Matthew 6     26 “Look at the birds of the air, for they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? 27 Which of you by worrying can add one cubit to his stature? 28 So why do you worry about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin; 29 and yet I say to you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. 30 Now if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is, and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will He not much more clothe you, O you of little faith?” Matthew 10     29 “…And not one of them (sparrows) falls to the ground apart from your Father’s will. 30But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. 31 Do not fear therefore; you are of more value than many sparrows.” Miracles are also part of his equation, but they are rare.When they don’t happen, we have to trust his perfect plan.

  1. People act freely within God’s overall will.

The best way to understand that is to imagine a road trip growing up. Mom and dad will get to the destination but it’s up to us as to how we will enjoy the trip. When it comes to humans, his sovereign will is always done, even if his moral will may be rejected. God’s purpose was to bring the people into the Promised Land. This was a preparation for the coming of the Messiah one day. Nonetheless, they all had a choice in how they would live in the land.Joshua 24:15 “And if it seems evil to you to serve the LORD, choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods which your fathers served that were on the other side of the River, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you dwell. But as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD.” Even evil has been allowed to exist temporarily but the boundary is set, as in Job. In his divine wisdom and care, he allows it. Through his foreknowledge, God already knows what we or evil will do, but everything is always within his reach and control. Isaiah 46:10 “Declaring the end from the beginning, And from ancient times things that are not yet done, Saying, ‘My counsel shall stand, And I will do all My pleasure,’”

  1. God works in us to bring us in partnership with his will and he uses prayers as a major means.

This happens through scripture, prayer, (personal and corporate) and fellowship with other believers. 1 John 5     14 “Now this is the confidence that we have in Him, that if we ask anything according to His will, He hears us. 15 And if we know that He hears us, whatever we ask, we know that we have the petitions that we have asked of Him.” Moses prayed for God’s people and miracles happened. The early church prayed and circumstances changed. Amos 3:7 “Surely the Lord GOD does nothing, Unless He reveals His secret to His servants the prophets.” Jesus wanted his disciples to participate in prayer. John 16      23 “And in that day you will ask Me nothing. Most assuredly, I say to you, whatever you ask the Father in My name He will give you. 24 Until now you have asked nothing in My name. Ask, and you will receive, that your joy may be full.” This applies to our personal lives as well because we are connected to his comprehensive plan. James 4:2 “…Yet you do not have because you do not ask.” Can we change the mind of God? In his perfect wisdom and plan, he has even allowed for that. His overall plan is always intact, but it does impact the immediate plan of God.

  1. Providence, Prayer, and everything else are ultimately connected to our salvation through Jesus Christ.

In every petition, we should ask – “How does the gospel of Jesus Christ fit in?” Don’t ask for a Ferrari to get to church on time! Romans 8     26 “Likewise the Spirit also helps in our weaknesses. For we do not know what we should pray for as we ought, but the Spirit Himself makes intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. 27 Now He who searches the hearts knows what the mind of the Spirit is, because He makes intercession for the saints according to the will of God. 28 And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose.”

Invitation: What do you believe about prayer? Does God answer? Can he answer? Have you prayed to invite Jesus into your life to be your Savior and King?

DAILY DEVOTIONS FROM THE ORIGINAL GREEK – 1 John 1:2 by Abidan Paul Shah

Daily Devotions from the Original Greek – 1 John 1:2 by Abidan Paul Shah

Papyrus 9, 1 John, 4,11–12,14–17 - recto

Papyrus 9, P. Oxy 402, 3rd century, 1 John, 4,11–12,14–17 – recto

1 John 1:2 – Καὶ ἡ ζωὴ ἐφανερώθη, καὶ ἑωράκαμεν, καὶ μαρτυροῦμεν, καὶ ἀπαγγέλλομεν ὑμῖν τὴν ζωὴν τὴν αἰώνιον, ἥτις ἦν πρὸς τὸν πατέρα, καὶ ἐφανερώθη ἡμῖν.

Parsing[1]:

Καὶ = And (conjunction coordinating from καί)

ἡ = the (definite article nominative feminine singular from ὁ)

ζωὴ = life (noun nominative feminine singular common from ζωή)

ἐφανερώθη = was revealed (verb indicative aorist passive 3rd person singular from φανερόω)

καὶ = and (conjunction coordinating from καί)

ἑωράκαμεν, = we have seen (verb indicative perfect active 1st person plural from ὁράω)

καὶ = and (conjunction coordinating from καί)

μαρτυροῦμεν, = we testify (verb indicative present active 1st person plural from μαρτυρέω)

καὶ = and (conjunction coordinating from καί)

ἀπαγγέλλομεν = we report (verb indicative present active 1st person plural from ἀπαγγέλλω)

ὑμῖν = to you (pronoun personal dative plural from σύ)

τὴν = the (definite article accusative feminine singular from ὁ)

ζωὴν = life (noun accusative feminine singular from ζωή)

τὴν = the (definite article accusative feminine singular from ὁ)

αἰώνιον, = eternal (adjective accusative feminine singular no degree from αἰώνιος)

ἥτις = whoever (adjective pronoun relative nominative feminine singular from ὅστις)

ἦν = was (verb indicative imperfect active 3rd person singular from εἰμί)

πρὸς = with (preposition from πρός)

τὸν = the (definite article accusative masculine singular from ὁ)

πατέρα, = father (noun accusative masculine singular from πατήρ)

καὶ = and (conjunction coordinating from καί)

ἐφανερώθη = was revealed (verb indicative aorist passive 3rd person singular from φανερόω)

ἡμῖν. = to us (pronoun personal dative plural from ἐγώ)

My Translation:

1 John 1:2 – And the life was revealed and we have seen and we testify and we report to you the eternal life which was with the Father and was revealed to us.

Some Devotional Thoughts:

John tells his readers that Jesus the life was revealed to this world. In other words, Jesus did not come through the agency of any human being or institution. He was revealed from above. As one of the disciples he was privileged to see Him. He is so sure of this that he is willing to testify about it. Now he wants to go about reporting about this eternal life. Again, the origin of the eternal life was not with human beings but with the Father. Once again, it is so awesome to see how much John is consumed with the appearance of Jesus. It was unlike anything on earth. In fact, Jesus is eternal life come down from the Father.

Here are some questions for all of us – “Are we consumed with Jesus?” “How much does He occupy our minds, thoughts, and daily conversation?” “Are we willing to testify to others that we have seen Jesus, albeit spiritually?” “What have we substituted for Jesus?” “Is Jesus eternal life to us?”

[1] The parsing is taken from Bible Works 10

DAILY DEVOTIONS FROM THE ORIGINAL GREEK – 1 John 1:1 by Abidan Paul Shah

Daily Devotions from the Original Greek – 1 John 1:1 by Abidan Paul Shah

Papyrus 9, P. Oxy 402, 3rd century, 1 John, 4,11–12,14–17 - recto

Papyrus 9, P. Oxy 402, 3rd century, 1 John, 4,11–12,14–17 – recto

 Through the years many people have approached me with the desire to study the Bible in the original languages. Not that they don’t trust the Bible in their English translations, they just have a hunger for more. The pattern is quite familiar – They ask me for resources. I provide them with the best tools. They wade into the murky waters of Grammar, Syntax, and Critical Issues of the biblical text. Some go farther than others but inevitably they all turn to familiar shores, never to venture again. It is truly unfortunate… Hence, these “Daily Devotions from the Original Greek.” They are in no way exhaustive exegetical commentaries. They’re simply my personal devotions based on the original languages. Hopefully, they will inspire some to cast anchor and sail into uncharted waters. My prayer is that you won’t despair when the winds howl or the waves threaten to overturn the boat. οἱ ἄνεμοι καὶ ἡ θάλασσα ὑπακούουσιν αὐτῷ. (Matt. 8:27)

Text:

1 John 1:1 – Ὃ ἦν ἀπ᾽ ἀρχῆς, ὃ ἀκηκόαμεν, ὃ ἑωράκαμεν τοῖς ὀφθαλμοῖς ἡμῶν, ὃ ἐθεασάμεθα καὶ αἱ χεῖρες ἡμῶν ἐψηλάφησαν περὶ τοῦ λόγου τῆς ζωῆς-

Parsing[1]:

Ὃ = What (pronoun relative nominative neuter singular from ὅς)

ἦν = was (verb indicative imperfect active 3rd person singular from εἰμί)

ἀπ᾽ = from (preposition genitive from ἀπό)

ἀρχῆς, = the beginning (noun genitive feminine singular common from ἀρχή)

ὃ = whom (pronoun relative accusative neuter singular from ὅς)

ἀκηκόαμεν, = we have heard (verb indicative perfect active 1st person plural from ἀκούω)

ὃ = whom (pronoun relative accusative neuter singular from ὅς)

ἑωράκαμεν = we have seen (verb indicative perfect active 1st person plural from ὁράω)

τοῖς definite article dative masculine plural from ὁ)

ὀφθαλμοῖς = eyes (noun dative masculine plural common from ὀφθαλμός)

ἡμῶν, = our (pronoun personal genitive plural from ἐγώ)

ὃ = whom (pronoun relative accusative neuter singular from ὅς)

ἐθεασάμεθα = we have witnessed (verb indicative aorist middle 1st person plural from θεάομαι)

καὶ = and (conjunction coordinating from καί)

αἱ definite article nominative feminine plural from ὁ)

χεῖρες = hands (noun nominative feminine plural common from χείρ)

ἡμῶν = our (pronoun personal genitive plural from ἐγώ)

ἐψηλάφησαν = have touched (verb indicative aorist active 3rd person plural from ψηλαφάω)

περὶ = with regard to (preposition genitive from περί)

τοῦ = the (definite article genitive masculine singular from ὁ)

λόγου = Word (noun genitive masculine singular common from λόγος)

τῆς definite article genitive feminine singular from ὁ)

ζωῆς = of Life (noun genitive feminine singular common from ζωή)

My Translation:

1 John 1:1 – What was from the beginning, what we have heard, what we have seen with our eyes, what we have witnessed and our hands have touched, with regard to the Word of Life.

Some Devotional Thoughts:

John begins his letter by spotlighting Jesus Christ. What an awesome way to begin a letter! What if we began every conversation with Christ? Won’t that keep our communication on the right path? Won’t that resolve most of our miscommunications in life? This does not mean that we have to verbally say His name or deliberately interject His name before we say anything else. What it does mean is that we need to have Christ at the forefront of our minds and hearts before we interact with any person – friend or foe. This will help guide our conversation in a God directed, empowered, and pleasing way.

What is also interesting to me is that John brings out the divine and human elements of the person of Christ. First, Christ is no mere man. He was from the beginning, which means He always was. In other words, He is God. Second, Christ is no mere distant deity. He came into this world. Men, women, boys, and girls had the opportunity to hear Him, see Him, witness His power and glory, and touch Him. Christ is God come beside us – touchable, vulnerable, and examinable.

Finally, the title that John attributes to Jesus is so majestic and yet simple – Word of Life. We know both the words “word” and “life.” Word = we use them all day long. They are uncountable. They may be petty or profound. Life = we exist and we experience. It is physical existence and yet more – emotional and mental subsistence. To say “Christ is the Word of Life” means Christ is the author, sustainer, meaning, and goal of life. Wow! Is Christ that central to your physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual existence? Why not ask Him to be?

[1] The parsing is taken from Bible Works 10

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