The Calling by Dr. Abidan Shah

CALLING by Dr. Shah, Clearview Church, Henderson

Introduction: How many of ya’ll know someone who does not have a filter? He/she says whatever is on the mind. He/she speaks without thinking. It gets this person into a lot of trouble. Are you that person! Would you also agree that you never have to worry about what this person is thinking? In many ways I just described for you the Apostle Peter. He did not have a filter. He often said things without thinking and it got him into a lot of trouble, especially with Jesus. Today, we are starting a brand-new series on I Peter. We were set to start this series back in July, but the more we prayed about it, the more we felt that some other messages had to come first. Main point: When Christ calls us, he calls us to follow and remain with him. To follow is to begin the journey with him, but to remain is to develop a personal relationship with him.

1 Peter 1:1 “Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, to the pilgrims of the Dispersion in Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia.”

Context: Who was Peter? In the Bible, he is known by 4 different names: Simon, Peter, Cephas, and Son of Jonah. His given name seems to be from Simeon, after one of the lost tribes of Israel. This name came back into prominence during the Maccabean period as a hope of national renewal. It could be that his parents named him in the hopes that the Messiah will come in his lifetime. How about the other brother being named Andrew, a Greek name? True, but he became a disciple of John the Baptizer! One more thing: Their hometown was Bethsaida, a minority Jewish community. When people grow up surrounded by majority other faiths, they either get assimilated or they become stronger in their convictions. It seems to be the latter for Peter and Andrew. In fact, they moved to Capernaum, a majority Jewish community, and he even married a girl from there. Quick Application: It matters how we raise our kids. I don’t want to claim more than the text allows, but it is very likely that Peter grew up in a God-fearing home.

So, where did the name “Peter” come from? To answer that, we need to turn to John 1starting in verse 35 Again, the next day, John stood with two of his disciples. 36 And looking at Jesus as He walked, he said, “Behold the Lamb of God!” This is the second time that John the Baptizer used that title to describe Jesus. So much is packed into that title:

  • The lamb represented sacrifice for sins as commanded in the Old Testament. Unlike the passive lambs that did not know what was coming for them, here was God’s lamb that would actively take the sins of the world upon himself.
  • But, there’s more here. When John the Baptizer called Jesus the Lamb of God, he was referring to his purity and blamelessness.
  • There’s still more. Jesus was “the” Lamb of God. The definite article tells everyone listening that there was no one else like him. He alone was God’s chosen one.
  • Wait, there’s still one more critical thing. In John 1:29 John the Baptizer actually adds, “Behold! The Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!” Jesus alone is the Savior of the world.

Application: Do you believe that Jesus willingly gave his life for you? Do you believe that he was pure and blameless, but he took your sins and mine upon himself? Do you believe that Jesus alone is God’s sacrifice for sins? Do you believe that Jesus alone is the Savior of the world?

What was the reaction of the two disciples when they heard John the Baptizer say that? 37 The two disciples heard him speak, and they followed Jesus. 38 Then Jesus turned, and seeing them following, said to them, “What do you seek?” This was not an ordinary question. Jesus asked this question to the soldiers that came to arrest him in the garden of Gethsemane. He asked that question to Mary Magdalene on Easter morning as she was weeping for him. This is the fundamental question of life.

Question: What are you seeking in life? Food, clothing, shelter, money, success, power, accolades. Augustine in his Confessions said, “Because you have made us for Yourself, and our hearts are restless till they find their rest in Thee.”

Listen to the response of the disciples: 38 “…They said to Him, “Rabbi” (which is to say, when translated, Teacher), “where are You staying?” This may seem like a normal question, but it has a deeper meaning. The Greek word for “staying” is “menein.” This is the word that Jesus used repeatedly in the gospel of John.

  • John 6:56 “He who eats My flesh and drinks My blood abides in Me, and I in him.”
  • John 8:31Then Jesus said to those Jews who believed Him, “If you abide in My word, you are My disciples indeed.”
  • John 12:46 “I have come as a light into the world, that whoever believes in Me should not abide in darkness.”
  • John 15:4 “Abide in Me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in Me. 5 “I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing. 6 If anyone does not abide in Me, he is cast out as a branch and is withered; and they gather them and throw them into the fire, and they are burned. 7 If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, you will ask what you desire, and it shall be done for you.”

What’s the point? Human beings are looking for something that will remain/last forever. We constantly fight against temporality (time is fleeting), change (everything changes in life), and death (the inevitable). Only Jesus will last!

What was Jesus’ response? 39 He said to them, “Come and see.” They came and saw where He was staying, and remained with Him that day (now it was about the tenth hour). Nothing else is given regarding this encounter, but listen to the response of one of the disciples. 40 One of the two who heard John speak, and followed Him, was Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother. 41 He first found his own brother Simon, and said to him, “We have found the Messiah” (which is translated, the Christ). Why did Andrew immediately go to find Peter? Could it be that Peter was struggling with his faith? Could it be that everything that he put his hope in had faded away? Could it be that Peter had become wishy-washy?

How was the interaction between Jesus and Peter? 42 And he brought him to Jesus. Now when Jesus looked at him, He said, “You are Simon the son of Jonah. You shall be called Cephas” (which is translated, A Stone). Every time in the Bible God changed someone’s name, it reflected something much greater – Abram became Abraham; Sarai became Sarah; Jacob became Israel; Saul became Paul. Name change implied a deep work of God in a person. Here Jesus called him Cephas (Kephas), which in Aramaic meant, “rock.” Rock in Greek was Peter. Why Rock? It symbolized stability, dependability, endurance, and perseverance. By the way, Jesus had to call Peter again later – Matthew 4     18 And Jesus, walking by the Sea of Galilee, saw two brothers, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen. 19 Then He said to them, “Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.” 20 They immediately left their nets and followed Him.

It took Peter sometime to understand what it meant to remain and abide with Jesus, but he did. John 6     65 And He said, “Therefore I have said to you that no one can come to Me unless it has been granted to him by My Father.” 66 From that time many of His disciples went back and walked with Him no more. 67 Then Jesus said to the twelve, “Do you also want to go away?” 68 But Simon Peter answered Him, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life. 69 Also we have come to believe and know that You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”

Peter made that declaration again and Jesus reaffirmed his new name – Matthew 16     13 When Jesus came into the region of Caesarea Philippi, He asked His disciples, saying, “Who do men say that I, the Son of Man, am?” 14 So they said, “Some say John the Baptist, some Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” 15 He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” 16 Simon Peter answered and said, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” 17 Jesus answered and said to him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah, for flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but My Father who is in heaven. 18 And I also say to you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it. When we are built upon the solid and immovable rock, Jesus Christ, we become immovable in the face of whatever may come.

Invitation: What are you seeking in life? Are you willing to follow Christ? Are you willing to remain with him? Are you built upon him? Are you saved by him?

Pathway by Dr. Abidan Shah

Many of our children and teens have either already started back to school or will be starting in the next few days. Parents often wonder about other influences their children will encounter and if they will follow God or the world. I want to remind you God is still in control and His promises are still true. That is a source of great hope for me as a parent!

This weekend, we will be focusing on Proverbs 22:6. This is a well-known verse, but when times are stressful or difficult, we are quick to forget God’s promise when our children are trained up under godly instruction. The title of this weekend’s message is “PATHWAY.”

What kind of instruction are you giving the children in your life? Are you sharing God’s Word with your own children and those in our church family? Are you saved? You cannot afford to miss this message. Invite your friends and family to come worship with us, too!

Abound by Dr. Abidan Shah

Abound

ABOUND by Dr. Shah, Clearview Church, Henderson 

Introduction: One sign that a baby is becoming a toddler is that he/she will say, “I do it” when it comes to feeding, putting on their shoes, or other activities that they previously relied on the parents. It’s a good thing because it’s an indication that the child is growing up and becoming independent. It can also be a sad time for some young parents, but I tell them, “Don’t worry. It reverses when they become teenagers!” In our series on Paul’s letter to the Philippians, we come to the often-quoted passage from Philippians 4:13, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” People claim that as a life-verse. They wear T-shirts with that verse. Athletes even tattoo it on their arms. Unfortunately, they don’t realize that they are talking it out of context. In today’s message, we’re going to learn that when it says “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me,” it’s not talking about overcoming incredible odds or reaching ambitious goals. It’s a declaration of the Christian’s ability to thrive whether one is down or abound. Turn in your Bibles to Philippians 4:10 and our message is titled “ABOUND.”

Philippians 4:10 “But I rejoiced in the Lord greatly that now at last your care for me has flourished again; though you surely did care, but you lacked opportunity.” What exactly was Paul saying here? To correctly understand this, we need to keep in mind the context of the Philippian church. Externally, they were facing persecution. Internally, they were at odds with each other. Fears without and fightings within. In the midst of all this mess, they had stopped supporting Paul’s ministry. How was he faring? Listen to his description of a similar situation in I Corinthians 4     11 “To the present hour we both hunger and thirst, and we are poorly clothed, and beaten, and homeless. 12 And we labor, working with our own hands…” By the way, since he was incarcerated, he couldn’t even work! If he ran out of food, maybe a soldier had pity on him and gave him some scraps. If he was freezing, maybe he found some old rags that he used to keep himself warm. Only eternity will reveal how much Paul suffered for the gospel. Then, there was a knock on the door and there stood a man by the name of Epaphroditus from the church in Philippi. Listen to Philippians 4:18 “Indeed I have all and abound. I am full, having received from Epaphroditus the things sent from you, a sweet-smelling aroma, an acceptable sacrifice, well pleasing to God.” As Paul said in Philippians 4:10 “I rejoiced in the Lord greatly,” he began celebrating on receiving the help from the Philippians.

Was Paul desperate for help from the Philippians? 11 “Not that I speak in regard to need, for I have learned in whatever state I am, to be content.” The word for learned is “manthano.” Here, it has the idea of a disciple learning how to follow the master. He has learned how to come to the place of being “content” = “autarkeia.” Content is not about be satisfied with you have and don’t get a better phone or an upgraded boat. The way this word is used implies complete readiness to accept whatever God has in store.

What does this kind of life look like? Verse 12 “I know how to be abased, and I know how to abound.” Abase = “tapeinos,” which implies having a lowly mind like that of Jesus. Abound = “perisseuo,” which meant to be full, beyond, exceed. “Everywhere and in all things I have learned both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need.” This time the word for learned is “myeo” which has the idea of learning how to grow spiritually. Now he says in verse 13 “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” The secret to his contentment is that “he has the strength to deal with all situations through Jesus Christ who strengthens me.” This is not about being 5 foot 3 and being able to dunk, unless you are Muggsy Bogues with a 44-inch vertical jump!

So, yes, Paul rejoiced greatly that the money had come, but, no, he wasn’t desperate.

Now, listen to Paul’s clarification: 14 “Nevertheless you have done well that you shared in my distress. 15 Now you Philippians know also that in the beginning of the gospel, when I departed from Macedonia, no church shared with me concerning giving and receiving but you only. 16 For even in Thessalonica you sent aid once and again for my necessities.” Did Paul depend on the Philippians for money? To answer that, we need to turn again to Paul’s letters to the Corinthians because here he gave us information on how ministries were to be supported. Listen to I Corinthians 9      7 “Who ever goes to war at his own expense? Who plants a vineyard and does not eat of its fruit? Or who tends a flock and does not drink of the milk of the flock?9 For it is written in the law of Moses, ‘You shall not muzzle an ox while it treads out the grain’…10…For our sakes, no doubt, this is written, that he who plows should plow in hope, and he who threshes in hope should be partaker of his hope. 11 If we have sown spiritual things for you, is it a great thing if we reap your material things?…13 Do you not know that those who minister the holy things eat of the things of the temple, and those who serve at the altar partake of the offerings of the altar?” In Judaism, every Jewish male was obligated to pay a half-shekel temple tax, along with the sacrifices. All this was used to support the priests, the Levites, and their families. 14 “Even so the Lord has commanded that those who preach the gospel should live from the gospel.” In other words, those who work in the church are supported by the tithes and offerings of those who are benefitted by the church, just like in the Old Testament temple. Now, Paul did not take any money from the Corinthians because of their bad attitude towards him. Listen to 2 Corinthians 11     7“Did I commit sin in humbling myself that you might be exalted, because I preached the gospel of God to you free of charge? 8 I robbed other churches, taking wages from them to minister to you. 9 And when I was present with you, and in need, I was a burden to no one, for what I lacked the brethren who came from Macedonia supplied. And in everything I kept myself from being burdensome to you, and so I will keep myself.” Nonetheless, Paul did not shortchange them. Listen to 2 Corinthians 12    14 Now for the third time I am ready to come to you. And I will not be burdensome to you; for I do not seek yours, but you…15 And I will very gladly spend and be spent for your souls…” The only place Paul did not ease up with the Corinthians was the collection for the poor in Jerusalem. 2 Corinthians 9:7“So let each one give as he purposes in his heart, not grudgingly or of necessity; for God loves a cheerful giver.”

Some of you may be wondering, “Why is Pastor Shah talking about all this?” Sometimes, people wonder why we take up tithes and offerings. We are following the pattern set for us by Paul in God’s word. We take up money to support the operation of the church, pay the staff of the church, provide help for those who are struggling near and far, and help missionaries and church planters all over the world to share the gospel and help the needy. We are an exceptional church where people give generously and wholeheartedly. Having said that, not everyone gives and not everyone gives as much as they should. How about you?

Did Paul benefit from his relationship with the Philippians? 17 “Not that I seek the gift, but I seek the fruit that abounds to your account.” Paul was saying that even though he needed the help and he was grateful for the gift, he was not depended on them for survival, nor was he trying to look for the gift. But, by sending their gift, the Philippians have pleased God and now have a share in Paul’s ministry. 18 “Indeed I have all and abound. I am full, having received from Epaphroditus the things sent from you, a sweet-smelling aroma, an acceptable sacrifice, well pleasing to God.” Paul described their gifts with the same words that he used to describe the sacrifice of Christ in Ephesians 5:2 “And walk in love, as Christ also has loved us and given Himself for us, an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweet-smelling aroma.” Finally, verse 19 “And my God shall supply all your need according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus.” In fact, Paul added, God will meet your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus.

What was Paul really trying to say here? Even though he was depended on them, he was not obligated to them. Even if they supported him financially, he was under God’s control not theirs. So also, people coming from a different church tradition think that since we pay the pastor or staff, he/they does/do what we tell him/them to do. Maybe even, he better do as we tell him to do. Sorry friend. You need to give because it is the right thing for you to do and it is good for you to do. You cannot control God’s ministers with money. If that happens, we will tell you what you want to hear and not what you need to hear.

Have you learned how to abound in Christ? It’s not about having things or not having things. It’s about being content in Christ. Is Christ enough for you?

Are you saved? Do you have Christ?

Episode 17: Running the Race (ft. Dr David Alan Black)

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In this episode, Abidan Paul Shah will be talking with Dr. David Alan Black about his newest book “Running My Race: Reflections on Life, Loss, Aging, and Forty Years of Teaching.” It’s about learning to deal with the pains of life in a way that draws us closer to the heart of God. Both laypeople and scholars will benefit from this book.

If you have any questions or topics you would like to be discussed, please tweet them to @hoipolloiradio.

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